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MARR Celebrates National Recovery Month

By September 18, 2013 No Comments
Carry the Message:
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MARR celebrates National Recovery MonthThe Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous describes alcoholism as “cunning, baffling, powerful.” For nearly 40 years, MARR’s seasoned professionals and committed staff members have seen the insidiousness of addiction — cunning, baffling and powerful indeed. This devastating and often deadly disease rips families apart and ruins relationships.

But we have also bore witness to the hope that lies in recovery.

This September marks the 24th annual National Recovery Month — celebrating individuals in recovery; promoting the benefits of prevention, treatment and recovery for mental and chemical dependency; lauding the contributions of treatment and service providers; and sharing the message that recovery, in all its forms, is possible. So, what does the month of September mean to the dedicated staff at MARR?

National Recovery Month is a reminder of how far we have come in the field of addiction treatment. Today, the medical community recognizes addiction as a disease and not a moral flaw. Women, once haunted by the stigma of addiction, can now discover their voice and their freedom in gender-specific treatment. Many recovery centers encourage the addict and his or her loved ones to embrace a program of recovery because addiction impacts the entire family system. Individuals with co-occurring disorders are no longer turned away; instead, they receive specialized attention in a safe environment. And there is increased awareness and education about chemical dependency in communities than ever before. These are just a few of the many positive changes that have taken place over the last several decades.

Although we celebrate recovery 365 days a year, MARR joyfully commemorates National Recovery Month. This September — and every month thereafter — it is our mission to bring lasting recovery to alcohol- and drug-addicted individuals. The Big Book of AA may describe alcoholism as “cunning, baffling, powerful,” but it also gives hope to the struggling addict that “there is a solution!”


Carry the Message:
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